Resident Birds

These birds may live at the Dells for some portions of the summer, the winter, or both. Birds that might breed at the Dells are noted.

Acadian Flycatcher (Empidonax virescens)

Lives in North American deciduous forests near bodies of water. The largest of the Empidonax, Acadian flycatchers are typically 0.4 - 0.5 oz with an average wingspan of 9.1 in. When vocal, their call is “peet-sah” and is typically occurs when in distress or on defense. Their diet consists of many insects, arachnids, and occasional berries. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

American Crow (Corvus Brachyrhynchos)

Crows can be found in abundance in almost all regions of North America. They can grow to be 11.1 - 21.9 oz. and have a 33.5 - 39.4 in. wingspan. Their wide-ranged diet includes insects, small mammals, aquatic animals, nuts, fruit, garbage, decaying roadkill, and pet food. They are very social and intelligent birds. There have been accounts where crows were seen using sticks and rocks as tools, and where groups of crows (murders) have worked together to steal food from other animals. Crows tend o be aggressive to other birds, such as hawks, and may even capture smaller birds for food. Their call is a distinct "caw." They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis)

American goldfinches live in North America year-round and are most commonly seen during winter months. They prefer to live near fields and can also be found in parks and backyards. Their diet consists strictly of seeds, but occasionally will eat an insect or two. American goldfinches weigh anywhere from 0.4 - 0.7 oz and have a wingspan of 7.5 - 8.7 in. Among the wide range of calls and songs they sing, the most common is “po-ta-to chip.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

American Kestrel (Falco sparverius)

Found throughout North America and live in moist areas such as fields, cities, deserts, mountains, and lowlands. American Kestrels weigh about 2.82 to 5.81 oz. and get up to 8.66 to 12.20 in. with a wingspan of 20.08 to 24.02 in. They eat insects, amphibians, and mammals.  American Kestrels communicate through calls sounding like “klee”, “killy”, or “chitter”/”whine”. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Becky Matsubara

American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla)

American Redstarts live on the edges of deciduous woodlands in most of North America. Their main food source is insects, and use their striking orange tail to stun prey. They usually weigh 0.2 - 0.3 oz and have a wingspan of 6.3 - 7.5 in. They are nocturnal migrators, and can be injured and killed by large structures during this period. The common calls that can be heard are “tsip” and “chip” sounds. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Dan Pancamo

American Robin (Turdus migratorius)

American Robins are among the most common North American birds; they can be found in practically all regions of the continent and in most habitats. They are a type of thrush, and are good indicators of springtime in the northern parts of the U.S. Their diet mainly consists of insects, fruits, and earthworms. American Robins hunt for earthworms using their sense of sight, not their hearing. Typical adults range from 2.7 - 3 oz and have a 12.2 - 15.7 in. wingspan. Their song is sung “cheerily, cheer up, cheer up, cheerily, cheer up” in a rhythmic matter. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

American Tree Sparrow (Spizella Arborea)

American Tree Sparrows prefer fields, open areas, and backyards to find food, but nest on the edges of forests. They can weigh from 0.5 - 1 oz and have a wingspan of about 9.4 in. They can be distinguished from other sparrows by their rust-colored cap. American Tree Sparrows feed on seeds during the winter and berries and insects during the summer. Flocks of these birds communicate with either a “teel-wit” or a “teedle-eet.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

American Woodcock (Scolopax minor)

The American Woodcock is found in southeastern Canada and in the United States mostly east of the Mississippi River. Due to their excellent camouflage, they are exceedingly hard to spot on the forest floor while probing for earthworms and other insects. Another name for these birds is a timberdoodle. They can weigh from 4.1 - 9.8 oz and have a wingspan of 16.5 - 18.9 in. During the mating season, males perform an aerial show and make a “peent” noise on the ground. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Fyn Kynd

 

Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus Leucocephalus)

Bald Eagles are found throughout North America and live in tall tree areas with a water source. Bald Eagles weigh about 9.47 lb. with a wingspan of 70.08 - 90.16 in.  Bald Eagles can fly up to 75 – 99 mph. They have a lifespan of 20 years in the wild. Bald Eagles eat a variety of fish, water birds, and mammal carcasses. Bald Eagles communicate using chirps, whistles, and harsh chatters. The chatter generally sounds like “kwit-kwit-kwit-kwit” or “kee-kee-kee-kee-ker”. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists and are the national bird of the United States.

Photo Credits: Becky Matsubara

Baltimore Oriole (Icterus galbula)

Baltimore Orioles live in open deciduous forests and can be found in backyards. Their diet includes insects, fruit, berries, nectar, and they can be lured to feeders with orange slices and/or nectar. Baltimore Orioles used to be categorized with Bullock’s Orioles, under the name of the Northern Oriole until the 1990s. They can be identified by their bright orange chests, black heads, and black and white wings. Their wingspan is 9.1-11.8 in. and they weigh 1.1-1.4 oz. Their song is a series of whistling noises. Baltimore Orioles weave beautiful hanging cup nests that can be seen dangling from trees. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica)

Barn Swallows can be found throughout North and South America, except for northern Canada and Alaska. They roost primarily in mud/clay nests on man-made structures, on cliffs, or in caves. Open fields are ideal to support their diet of insects. They weigh from 0.6 - 0.6 oz and have a wingspan of 11.4 - 12.6 in. There are many calls that come from Barn Swallows, but an unusual one is a mechanical “whirr” sound. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: JJ Cadiz

Barred Owl (Strix varia)

Found throughout southwestern North America and extends throughout the eastern United States. Barred Owls live in coniferous forests, wooded swamps, and wherever there is dense foliage with water nearby. These owls roost most commonly in hollow tree cavities. They weigh 22.20 to 28.19 oz. with a wingspan of 42.13 to 43.70 in. Barred owls communicate by a 9 syllable hoot called a two-phrased hoot. Perhaps the most commonly known owl call, their “Who cooks for you?” can be heard during the day or night. Contrary to popular belief, Barred Owls are diurnal, which means they can be active at any time throughout the whole 24-hour day, but most commonly during the evening. Barred owls eat rabbits, rodents, insects, amphibians, and reptiles. Known predators are raccoons and Great horned owls. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Fyn Kynd

Bell's Vireo (Vireo bellii)

Bell’s Vireos live mainly in Mexico, with exceptions being the southernmost parts of western states and throughout the midwest. They grow to be 0.2 - 0.4 oz and have an average of 7.1 in wingspan. They live in low vegetation that is near bodies of water. These vireos are insectivorous, but also eat arachnids. Their call is an odd "Cheedle-cheedle-cheedle-chee, cheedle-cheedle-cheedle-chew" that first ends with a high note, and then a low note. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Andy Reago & Chrissy McClarren

Belted Kingfisher (Ceryle alcyon)

Belted Kingfishers grow to be 4.9 - 6 oz. with a wingspan of 18.9 - 22.8 in. They live near bodies of water and nest in burrows in the bank. They rely on aquatic animals for food, but sometimes eat small animals on land. Their call is a mechanical rattle that varies in length. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Black-billed Cuckoo (Coccyzus erythropthalmus)

Black-billed Cuckoos live mostly in deciduous forests and shrubby areas. They eat caterpillars, other insects, some fruits and berries, and other invertebrates. Their average wingspan is 13.4-15.7 in. and they weigh around 1.4-2.3 oz. Some cuckoos may lay their eggs in the nests of other birds. They are usually heard, not seen, and make a “cu-cu-cu” sound. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: HarmonyonPlanetEarth

Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus)

Black-capped Chickadees live in cavities in mostly deciduous or mixed forests and urban areas. Their diet consists of plant matter such as berries and seeds and insects, animal fat, and bird feeders. They can weigh up to 0.5 oz. and have a wingspan of 6-8 in. Black-capped Chickadees say their name in their call: “Chick-a-dee-dee” or “dee-dee-dee.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

 

Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata)

Blue Jays can be found in deciduous and mixed forests, woodland edges, and urban areas such as parks, neighborhoods, and backyards. Their diet is made up mostly of berries, seeds, and nuts, but also includes insects and other bird eggs. Like many blue-colored birds, Blue Jays are not actually blue, but brown. Their feathers are structured to reflect the light that hits them so they appear blue. Blue Jays have a wingspan of 13.4-16.9 in. and weigh 2.5-3.5 oz. They make a loud, sometimes piercing “JAY!” noise, but are also known to imitate the call of a Red-shouldered Hawk. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Dawn Huczek

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea)

Blue-gray Gnatcatchers live mostly near water and in deciduous forests and their edges. Their diet consists of insects such as grasshoppers, leafhoppers, beetles, and other bugs. They are about 0.2-0.3 oz. and have a wingspan of about 6.3 in. They make many noises, some of which are “zeee” and “bee-beee.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Blue-winged Warbler (Vermivora cyanoptera)

Blue-winged Warblers live in open woodlands. Their range is expanding, and may be the cause of decreases in Golden-winged Warbler populations. Blue-winged and Golden-winged Warblers sometimes interbreed and make “Lawrence’s Warblers” and “Brewster’s Warblers.” Blue-winged Warblers have a general wingspan of 5.9 in. and weigh around 0.3 oz. They eat insects and arachnids. These Warblers make a “bee-buzz” sound. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Melanie C Underwood

Bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus)

Bobolinks live in fields and grasslands. They feed mainly on insects, seeds, and grains. The male's coloration is an odd combination of a black breast, white back, and light yellow cap. They are both polygynous and polyandrous, which means both the males and females have multiple mates. Bobolinks have a wingspan of about 10.6 in. and weigh 1-2 oz. Their calls are “pink,” “chunk,” “see-yew,” and “zeep.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list. (Male Pictured)

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Broad-winged Hawk (Buteo platypterus)

Found in North America and lives in deciduous mixed forests. They tend to stay inside the forest, unlike many other hawks that stay on forest edges. Broad-winged hawks weigh about 9.3-19.8 oz. with a wingspan of 31.9-39.4 in. They eat small mammals, amphibians, reptiles, and invertebrates. Their call is a high-pitched “kee-ee.” During their migration period, they can be spotted in groups of over ten-thousand birds (not necessarily all Broad-winged Hawks) flying from North America to South and Central America. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Julie Waters

Brown Creeper (Certhia americana)

Brown Creepers can be found in both deciduous and coniferous forests and their edges. They eat insects, larvae, arachnids, and occasionally come to feeders. They weigh 0.2-0.4 oz. and have a wingspan of 6.7-7.9 in. Due to their extraordinary camouflage, it is very unlikely to spot a Brown Creeper on a tree, and easier to see a “piece of bark” flying away. Their song says “trees, beautiful trees,” and their call is similar to the sound of a chain dropping. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Brown Thrasher (Toxostoma rufum)

Brown Thrashers live in dense, shrubby areas and forest edges. They eat insects, other invertebrates, and many nuts, seeds, berries, and fruit. Their wingspan is 11.4-12.6 in. and they weigh 2.2-3.1 oz. Brown Thrashers use mimicry and their calls and songs are usually made with 2-phrase repetitions. They also make kissing noises and whistles. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater)

Brown-headed Cowbirds live in open areas such as fields, grasslands, and forest edges. They do not build their own nests, but practice a method that is called “brood parasitism” where females lay their eggs in the nests of other birds. This behavior can be hurtful to the hosts, as many of the original chicks die. Brown-headed Cowbirds are also believed to have traveled with the American Bison before their range expanded outwards from the Great Plains. They eat seeds, insects, and other invertebrates. Their wingspan is 14.2 in. they weigh 1.5-1.8 oz. Brown-headed Cowbirds click, chatter, and whistle. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

 

Canada Goose (Branta Candensis)

The Canada Goose is perhaps one of the most common birds in the Midwest. They can be found anywhere from rivers to golf courses, from lakes to shopping malls. Canada Geese eat mainly plant material such as aquatic plants, grains, and grasses, but will also eat small aquatic invertebrates and fish. Their honks can be heard from long distances and their aerial “V” shapes can be seen migrating in the Spring and Fall seasons. They weigh anywhere from 7-20 lbs. and have a wingspan of 4-6 ft. A group of geese is called a “gaggle” and baby geese are called “goslings.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Becky Matsubara

Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus)

Carolina Wrens live in the understory of deciduous and mixed forests and suburban areas. They eat insects, other invertebrates, and fruits. They have a wingspan of about 11.4 in. and weigh about 0.6-0.8 oz. Their call sounds like “tea-kettle, tea-kettle” and they sometimes sing constantly. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum)

Cedar Waxwings live in all types of forests and in open areas along streams. They eat berries, fruit, and insects. Their main diet is fruit, and there have been incidents where Cedar Waxwings have consumed over-ripe berries and have died from the alcohol content in the fermented fruits. They weigh around 1.1 oz. and have a wingspan of 8.7-11.8 in. Cedar Waxwings make a high pitched “bzee” noise. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Cerulean Warbler (Setophaga cerulea)

Cerulean Warblers live in deciduous forests with little to no undergrowth. They eat insects, although not much is known about their diet. Cerulean Warblers are considered “Vulnerable to Endangerment” due to Cowbird parasitism and habitat loss. Their wingspan is about 7.9 in. and they weigh 0.3-0.4 oz. Their call is a series of very buzzy “zee” noises. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Melanie C Underwood 

Chestnut-sided Warbler (Setophaga pensylvanica)

Chestnut-sided Warblers live in deciduous forests and brushy undergrowth. They eat insects, other invertebrates, and fruit. Their wingspan is 7.1-8.3 in. The clearing of forests has aided in a population increase since the 1800s. Their call says “pleased to MEETCHA.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Melanie C Underwood

Chimney Swift (Chaetura palagecia)

Chimney Swifts live mostly in urban areas and towns due to the decline of large hollowed out trees. They nest in chimneys, as their name suggests. They weigh about 0.6-1.1 oz. with a wingspan of 10.6-11.8 in. Chimney Swifts eat aerial insects. Their call consists of fast “chips” that may sound like buzzing. Their status is near threatened in North America due to new, unsuitable chimney structures. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Keith Edkins/US NPS 

Chipping Sparrow (Spizella passerina)

Chipping Sparrows live in open woodlands, parks, and backyards. They eat seeds, insects, and small fruit. They have a wingspan of about 8.3 in. and weigh 0.4-0.6 oz. Chipping Sparrows’ calls are “see-see-see” and “zeeeee.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Cliff Swallow (Petrochelydon pyrrhonata)

Cliff Swallows live near water where there is any structure to build colonies on, such as man made buildings or bridges, or cliffsides. They eat aerial insects. Cliff Swallows can grow to weigh 0.7-1.2 oz. and have a wingspan of 11-11.8 in. Their main call is a “chur” noise, but they also squeak and purr. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Marlin Harms

Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula)

Common Grackles live in open areas such as meadows, parks, empty lots, and agricultural areas. They eat insects, other invertebrates, berries, seeds, and grains. They have a wingspan of 14.2-18.1 in. and weigh about 2.6-5 oz. Their song is “readle-eak” and whistles. Common Grackles make a nasally call like “chaa.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Mdf (Wikimedia Commons)

Common Nighthawk (Chordeiles minor)

Common Nighthawks live in open areas such as clearings, rooftops of towns and cities, and anywhere that has a flat surface for nesting. They are most likely to be seen during dusk and dawn, but are active during the day and night also. They eat flying insects. Fossils of Common Nighthawks have been found throughout most of the United States dating back 400,000 years. They have a large wingspan of 20.9-22.4 in. and weigh 2.3-3.5 oz. Their call is similar to the American Woodcock’s nasal “peent” but also make an “auk auk auk” noise. During mating, males “boom” with their wings by diving and flapping their wings. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Common Redpoll (Acanthis flammea)

Common Redpolls live in open wooded areas. They eat many seeds, some berries, and insects. Their wingspan is 7.5-8.7 in. and they weigh 0.4-0.7 oz. Their breeding zone is in the lands that wrap around the Arctic Ocean. Their calls are chatters and whistles. Common Redpolls are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: dfaulder (Flickr)

Common Snipe (Gallinago gallinago)

Common Snipes live in wetlands and marshy areas. They eat insects and other invertebrates such as earthworms and crustaceans. Their wingspan is 17.3-18.5 in. and they weigh 2.5-6.4 oz. Common Snipes are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo credits: Wikimedia Commons user Alpsdake

Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas

Common Yellowthroats live in marshes and wet, low brushy areas. They eat insects, arachnids, and seeds. They have a wingspan of 5.9-7.5 in. and weigh 0.3-0.4 oz. Common Yellowthroats sing a distinct song that says “wichity wichity wichity.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Lynn Watson

Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii)

Native to North America and live in deciduous mixed forests. Cooper’s Hawks look like larger versions of Sharp-shinned Hawks. They typically weigh 7.8-14.5 oz. and have a wingspan of 24.4-35.4 in. Cooper’s Hawks communicate with a “kak-kak-kak” noise. They eat small birds, eastern chipmunks, and other small mammals. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Fyn Kynd

Dark-eyed Junco (Junco hyemalis)

Dark-eyed Juncos live in coniferous and mixed forests, open woodlands, and backyards. They eat seeds, insects, and berries. They weigh 0.6-1.1 oz . and have a wingspan of 7.1-9.8 in. Dark-eyed Juncos twitter, trill, and whistle, but do not have a very distinct call. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Dickcissel (Spiza americana)

Dickcissels live in open areas such as prairies, meadows, and agricultural fields.They eat seeds from the grasses and crops around them and insects such as grasshoppers and beetles. Dickcissels have a wingspan of about 9.8 in. and weigh 0.8-1 oz. Their song say “dick, dick, ciss, ciss, ciss.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens)

Downy Woodpeckers are the smallest woodpecker in North America, and are often confused with young Hairy Woodpeckers. They eat insects, seeds, and are often drawn to suet feeders. They are common along backyards and in deciduous forests. Downy Woodpeckers can weigh anywhere from 0.7-1 oz. and have a wingspan of 9.8-11.8 in. They do not usually make noises other than drumming on hard objects for communication. Downys can make a high-pitched “pik” noise. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Eastern Bluebird (Sialia sialis)

Eastern Bluebirds live in open areas, forest edges, and in nesting boxes. Their diet consists of insects such as grasshoppers and beetles, arachnids, other invertebrates, and berries. They weigh about 1 oz. and have a wingspan of 9.8-12.6 in. Eastern Bluebirds have a low call that says “tu-a-wee.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Eastern Kingbird (Tyrannus tyrannus)

Eastern Kingbirds live mostly in open, grassy areas and on the edges of forests. Their diet consists of insects and fruit. Eastern Kingbirds grow to be 1.2-1.9 oz. with a wingspan of 13-15 in. Their song is a high sputtering that ends with buzzing. Their name comes from their hidden crest, which can be one of multiple bright colors and only is shown when threatened. Eastern Kingbirds may be mistaken for Eastern Wood Pewees, but can be distinguished by their white-tipped tail. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Andy Reago & Chrissy McClarren

Eastern Meadowlark (Sturnella magna)

Eastern Meadowlarks live in open areas such as prairies, meadows, grasslands, and occasionally agricultural fields. Their diet consists of insects and seeds. Despite its name, the Eastern Meadowlark is not a lark, it is in the blackbird family. They weigh 3.2-5.3 oz. and have a wingspan of 13.8-15.7 in. Their call says “see-you, see yeeer” and they also whistle. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Eastern Phoebe (Sayornis phoebe)

Eastern Phoebes live in woods near water and nest on many man-made structures. Their diet is mainly insects and sometimes fruit. This was the first species of bird to be banded in North America. They usually weigh 0.5-0.6 oz. and have a wingspan of 10.2-11 in. Eastern Phoebes say their name “fee-bee.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Eastern Towhee (Pipilus Erythrophthalmus)

Eastern Towhees live mainly in the understory of forests and spend much of their time on the ground. Their diet consists of berries, seeds, insects, and other invertebrates. They have a wingspan of 7.9-11 in. and weigh 1.1-1.8 oz. Formerly known as “Rufous-sided Towhees,” Eastern Towhees were categorized with Spotted Towhees. Eastern Towhees make a very noticeable call that says “Drink your tea, drink your tea.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Eastern Screech Owl (Megascops asio)

Eastern Screech Owls live in any forests, can thrive in suburban areas, and tend to nest in nest boxes. Eastern Screech Owls weigh about 4.3-8.6 oz. and have a wingspan of around 18.9-24 in. They have three different types of coloring, brown morph, red morph, and grey morph. Eastern Screech Owls communicate by calls such as trills, low hoots, and rattles. They only screech if danger is present. They eat insects, amphibians, rodents, and small birds. Eastern Screech Owls have a mutualistic relationship with blind snakes when feeding their young. If the snakes escape owlette mouths’, they burrow in the nest and eat ants, flies, and other insect infestations. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Flickr user Sheribeari

Eastern Whip-poor-will (Caprimulgus vociferus)

Eastern Whip-poor-wills live in dry deciduous woodlands, mixed woodlands, and secondary growth forests. Whip-poor-wills are nocturnal and form small flocks for migration. They weigh about 1.52 to 2.24 oz. and grow up to 8.66 to 10.24 in. Whip-poor-will communicate by their most known three tone call “Whip-poor-will”. They also use growls, hisses, and “quirt” for excitement or stress. Whip-poor-wills eat moths, mosquitoes, crickets, and other insects. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: pixabay user dalmoarraes

Eastern Wood Pewee (Contopus virens)

The Eastern Wood Pewee lives in deciduous and coniferous forests and in any other wooded areas, such as parks and roadsides. They eat insects and other invertebrates. Their wingspan is 9.1-10.2 in. and they weigh 0.4-0.7 oz. Eastern Wood Pewees say their name in their “pee-a-weee” song. The are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris)

European Starlings live near people in parks, neighborhoods, towns, and other urban areas. They are not native to North America and were brought to the United States in the late 19th century. Their main diet is insects, but they also eat berries, seeds, and garbage. European Starlings have a wingspan of 12.2-15.7 in. and weigh 2.1-3.4 oz. They are very good at mimicking other bird songs, such as the Eastern Wood Pewee and the Brown-headed Cowbird. They are NOT protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Katja Schulz

Evening Grosbeak (Coccothraustes vespertinus)

Evening Grosbeaks live in coniferous and mixed woodlands. Their diet consists of insects such as the spruce budworm, seeds, and fruit. Their wingspan is 11.8-14.2 in. and they weigh 1.9-2.6 oz. Evening Grosbeaks make short, separated chirps. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Francesco Veronesi

Field Sparrow (Spizella pusilla)

Field Sparrows live in scrubby areas with bushes and shrubs. Their diet consists of insects and seeds. They weigh 0.4-0.5 oz. and have an average wingspan of 7.9 in. Field Sparrows sing single, repeated notes and accelerate to an ending trill. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Fox Sparrow (Passerella iliaca)

Fox Sparrows live in wooded areas and thickets. Their diet consists of insects, arachnids, seeds, and fruit. There are 4 different types of Fox Sparrows, which are categorized by their appearance and regions. Fox Sparrows’ songs also differ by type, and are all sweet-sounding chirpy songs. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Golden-crowned Kinglet (Regulus satrapa)

Golden-crowned Kinglets live in coniferous forests and eat insects. They have a wingspan of 5.5-7.1 in. and weigh 0.1-0.3 oz. Their main call is a “tsee” that is usually high in pitch and is repeated many times. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Grasshopper Sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum)

Grasshopper Sparrows live in open areas such as prairies and grasslands.  Their diet consists of insects, and as their name suggests, is very grasshopper-based. They weigh 0.5-0.7 oz. and have a wingspan of 4.3-4.7 in. Grasshopper Sparrows are also named because of their song, which is a “kip-kip-zeeeee” that resembles a grasshopper. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis)

Gray Catbirds live in dense, shrubby areas. Their diet consists of insects, fruit, berries, and food at bird feeders. They have a wingspan of 8.7-11.8 in. and weigh 0.8-2 oz. Gray Catbirds are able to mimic some other birds’ calls, but their unmistakable call sounds like a kitten’s “mew.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias)

Whether wading in a stream or soaring above, Great Blue Herons are one of the most common majestic birds one can see in Northern Illinois. They live in trees near bodies of water, such as swamps, rivers, ponds, and lakes. Their diet consists of aquatic life such as fish, amphibians, crustaceans, reptiles, small mammals, and some birds. They have a wingspan of 5.5-6.6 ft., grow to be 3.2-4.5 ft. tall, and weigh 4.6-5.5 lbs. Great Blue Herons croak and honk. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Andrea Westmoreland

Great Crested Flycatcher (Myiarchus crinitus)

Great Crested Flycatchers live in the top of trees in mostly deciduous forests and their edges. They eat insects and berries. These flycatchers prefer to live in holes in trees and bird boxes. They usually have a wingspan of 13.4 in. and weigh about 1-1.4 oz. Their most common call is a loud “whee-eep” noise that whistles. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus)

Great Horned Owls live in mixed woods and open fields, grasslands, deserts, and urban areas. They weigh 32.1-88.2 oz. with a wingspan of 39.8-57.1 in. They have binocular vision, meaning their forward vision is great whereas their peripheral is poor. Great horned owls eat rabbits, rodents, other birds, insects, amphibians, and reptiles. They give off low “hoo’s” or whistle, bark, and coo. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Elaine Malott

Green Heron (Butorides virescens)

Also known as: Green Backed Heron, Striated Heron

Green Herons live on the edges of bodies of water. Their main diet is small fish, but they also eat invertebrates. Green Herons sometimes use “tools” to attract fish, such as worms, sticks, and insects. They can grow to be 8.5 oz. with a wingspan of 25.2-26.8 in. They are recognizable by their “skeow” call that is loud and rough, or their “kuk-kuk-kuk” sounds. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Hairy Woodpecker (Picoides villosus)

Hairy Woodpeckers live in deciduous, coniferous, and mixed forests. Their diet consists mainly of wood-boring insects, but also includes flying insects, seeds, and some sap. Their wingspan is 13-16.1 in. and they weigh 1.4-3.4 oz. Hairy Woodpeckers and Downy Woodpeckers are often confused with each other, but can be differentiated by their beaks and overall sizes. They drum on trees and make a “peek” noise that is lower than the Downy’s. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

 

Herring Gull (Larus argentatus)

Herring Gulls live on the coasts of bodies of water such as bays, oceans, and lakes. They also live in open areas that have water. Their diet consists of aquatic invertebrates, fish, mollusks, earthworms, and other bird eggs. They weigh 1.8-2.8 lbs. And have a wingspan of 4.5-4.8 ft. Their call is “kuk-kuk-kuk-kuk” or “yucca-yucca-yucca.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Francesco Veronesi

Horned Lark (Aremophila alpestris)

Horned Larks live in areas that have short grass and little to no trees, such as certain prairies, grasslands, grazing meadows, and more urban areas. Their diet consists of seeds, insects, and other invertebrates. Their average wingspan is 11.8-13.4 in. and they weigh 1-1.7 oz. Horned Larks sing a series of tinkling “ti-ti” phrases. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Andy Reago & Chrissy McClarren

House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus)

House Finches live mostly in urban areas such as towns, cities, and parks. Their diet is almost completely berries, seeds, and fruit. They weigh 0.6-1 oz. and have a wingspan of 7.9-9.8 in. House Finches are commonly confused with Purple Finches, due to their almost identical coloring. However, male House Finches seem to have light brown bars on their breasts, whereas Purple Finches are usually more solidly cream/red. They sing a jumbled song. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

House Sparrow (Passer domesticus)

House Sparrows live in urban areas with humans, such as towns, parks, large cities, and neighborhoods. Their diet includes seeds, insects, and food crumbs. Their wingspan is 7.5-9.8 in. and they weigh 1-1.1 oz. House Sparrows make a “cheerup” sound. They are NOT protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Becky Matsubara

House Wren (Ttroglodytes aedon)

House Wrens live absolutely anywhere there are trees, ranging from deciduous and coniferous forests to backyards and swamps. Their diet consists of insects, spiders, and snails. House Wrens weigh about 0.4 oz. and have an average wingspan of 5.9 in. They sing “ch-ch-chur cha-chur cha-chur chchrruuuup” in a series of chirps. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea)

Indigo Buntings live in shrubby areas and on the edges of woodlands. They eat seeds, insects, and arachnids. Indigo Buntings have a wingspan of 7.5-8.7 in. and weigh about 0.4-0.6 oz. When migrating, they use the stars to navigate. Their common song is “What? What? Where? Where? See it! See it!” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Kentucky Warbler (Geothlypis formosa)

Kentucky Warblers live in deciduous undergrowth near running water. Their diet consists of insects and berries. They weigh 0.4-0.5 oz. and have a wingspan of 7.1-8.7 in. Kentucky Warblers sing “tur-dee tur-dee tur-dee tur-dee.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Andy Reago & Chrissy McClarren

Killdeer (Charadrius vociferus)

Killdeer are found in open areas such as fields, prairies, and empty lots. They are a type of plover, which are characterized by short beaks and longer legs. Killdeer are most commonly seen running quickly along the ground. Their main diet is invertebrates, such as worms and insects. They weigh around 2.6-4.5 oz. and have a wingspan of 18.1-18.9 in. Killdeer are named for the noise they make in flight, which is a high-pitched “kill-deer.”

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Least Flycatcher (Empidonax minimus)

Least Flycatchers are the smallest of the Empidonax. They live in open deciduous and mixed forests. Their diet includes many insects such as flies and caterpillars, arachnids, berries, and seeds. Their average wingspan is 7.9 in. and they weigh 0.3-0.5 oz. Least Flycatchers sing a distinguishable “chebec” sound. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Lincoln's Sparrow (Melospiza lincolnii)

Lincoln's Sparrows live in shrubby areas and thickets. Their diet consists of insects and seeds. They weigh 0.5-0.7 oz. and are 5.1-5.9 in. long. Lincoln’s Sparrows’ songs begin with a two-note “cheer-cheer” and end with a trill and multiple singular notes. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Long-eared Owl (Asio otus)

Long-eared Owls live in coniferous forests and other wooded areas. They weigh 7.8-15.3 oz. and have a wingspan is 35.4-39.4 in. Long-eared owls communicate by using musical hoots, single calls, shrieks, and physical displays. Long-eared owls eat voles, mice, shrews, small birds, small snakes, and insects. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Darrel Birkett

Louisiana Waterthrush (Parkesia motacilla)

Louisiana Waterthrushes live in deciduous forests near streams. Their diet consists of insects, crustaceans, mollusks, and some small fish. Their average wingspan is 9.4 in. and they weigh 0.7-0.8 oz. Louisiana Waterthrushes sing three clear notes that are followed by a short jumble. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)

Mallards live in any available source of water, such as rivers, lakes, ponds, and other man-made bodies. Their diet includes aquatic animals such as tadpoles, insects, and crustaceans, and plant matter such as tubers, leaves, and seeds. They weigh 2.2-2.9 lbs. and have a wingspan of 2.7-3.1 ft. Female mallards make the well-known “quack” noise, whereas males do not quack, but make a raspy noise. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Tom Koerner/USFWS

Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura)

Mourning Doves live in any open area that is not dense with trees. They are a very common sight in neighborhoods and in cities. Their diet consists mainly of seeds, but occasionally includes snails. Their average wingspan is 17.7 in. and they weigh 3-6 oz. Mourning Doves are named for their sorrowful sounding “coo-coo-coo” that is a common noise in urban areas. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Becky Matsubara

Mourning Warbler (Geothlypis philadelphia)

Mourning Warblers live in shrubby, dense undergrowth in deciduous forests. They eat insects and Cecropia plant matter. Their average wingspan is 7.1 in. and they weigh 0.4-0.5 oz. Mourning Warblers sing “chirry-chirry-chirry-choory-choory” that descends in pitch. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Andy Reago & Chrissy McClarren

Northern Bobwhite (Colinus virginianus)

The Northern Bobwhite lives in open areas such as grasslands, meadows, and pastures. Their diet consists of seeds and insects. There are 22 subspecies that can be distinguished by the males’ difference in plumage. They are the only quails that are native to the eastern United States. Northern Bobwhites say their name in their call: “bob-WHITE.” They are NOT protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Andy Morffew

Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis)

Northern Cardinals are found throughout eastern United States. They prefer areas of overgrown fields, backyards, forests edges, hedgerows, and puts nests in dense foliage. Their diet consists of a range of seeds, grains and fruits, along with weeds, insects, and spiders. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.  Northern cardinals are also the state bird in Illinois. They weigh up to 1.5–1.7 oz and have a wingspan of 9.8–12.2 in. Among the wide range of calls and songs they sing, the most common is “cheer, cheer, cheer” or “birdie, birdie, birdie”. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus)

Northern Flickers live in woodlands, but spend much of their time on the ground foraging for insects. Their main food staple is insects, mostly ants and beetles, but also eats fruits. They make drumming noises with any objects they can find. Northern Flickers also make a rattling call that is very close to the Pileated Woodpecker’s call. They can grow to be 3.9-5.6 oz. with a wingspan of 16.5-20.1 in. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Northern Parula Warbler (Setophaga americana)

Northern Parula Warblers live mostly in deciduous forests near moving water that has moss to build nests with. They eat insects, berries, seeds, and some buds. Their wingspan is 6.3-7.1 in. and they weigh 0.2-0.4 oz. Northern Parula Warblers sing a buzzy trill. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Northern Rough Winged Swallow (Stelgidopteryx serripennis)

Northern Rough-winged Swallows live in a variety of areas ranging from man-made structures to on banks near water. They eat aerial insects. This Swallow weighs around 0.4-0.6 oz. and can have a wingspan of 10.6-11.8 in. They make a “brrt” noise that is a low tone. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Northern Saw-whet Owl (Aegolius acadicus) 

Northern Saw-whet Owls live in coniferous forests, mixed forests, and deciduous forests. They weigh about 2.3-5.3 oz. with a wingspan of 16.5-18.9 in. Northern Saw-whet owls allopreen, which is taking care of one another's feathers. Northern Saw-whets eat voles, mice, shrews, squirrels, small birds, and insects. Common calls of the Northern Saw-whet include “too-too-too” and a “tsst” noise. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Kameron Perensovich

Orchard Oriole (Icterus spurius)

Orchard Orioles live in open woodlands and areas with scattered trees, such as orchards, parks, and the edges of bodies of water. Their diet includes insects, berries, and nectar. Their average wingspan is 9.8 in. and they weigh 0.6-1 oz. Orchard Orioles do not have the bright orange of most others, instead brandishing a more burnt rust color on their breasts. Their call begins with a “chuk” and continues with a chatter, and their song is a series of whistling notes. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla)

Ovenbirds live in deciduous and mixed forests. They prefer to live near the understory, and build their oven-like nests on the forest floor. Their diet consists of insects, arachnids, and seeds. They weigh 0.6-1 oz. and have a wingspan of 7.5-10.2 in. The Ovenbirds’ call says “teacher, teacher, teacher, teacher, teach.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Pileated Woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus)

Pileated Woodpeckers live in mature deciduous, coniferous, and mixed forests. Their diet includes ants, wood-boring beetles, termites, fruit, nuts, and seeds from feeders. Their wingspan is 2.2-2.5 ft. and they weigh 8.8-12.3 oz. Pileated Woodpeckers make a repeated “wuk” call that increases in volume. They also drum on trees. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Pine Siskin (Spinus pinus)

Pine Siskins live in coniferous and mixed woodlands. Their diet consists of seeds, some insects, and minerals such as salt. They weigh 0.4-0.6 oz. and have a wingspan of 7.1-8.7 in. Pine Siskins sing a buzzy, chirpy song. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Purple Finch (Haemorhous purpureus)

Purple Finches live in coniferous and mixed forests along with near urban areas such as backyards. Their diet consists of seeds, berries, and fruit. They weigh 0.6-1.1 oz. and have a wingspan of 8.7-11.2 in. Purple Finches sing a musical, warbling song. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Fyn Kynd

Red-bellied Woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus)

Red-bellied Woodpeckers live in deciduous and coniferous forests. Their diet consists mostly of insects and plant material. Red-bellied Woodpeckers can grow to be 2-3.2 oz. with a wingspan of 13-16.5 in. Their call is a “kwir,” “chur,” or “cha cha cha.” Red-bellied Woodpeckers are commonly called “Red-headed Woodpeckers” because of their red cap, but they are two different types of birds. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Red-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta canadensis)

Red-breasted Nuthatches live mostly in coniferous forests. They eat insects and seeds. Like the White-breasted Nuthatch, they will most likely be seen moving upside down or up and down tree trunks. Red-breasted Nuthatches weigh about 0.3-0.5 oz. and have a wingspan of 7.1-7.9 in. Their call is also similar to that of a White-breasted Nuthatch. Theirs is a more nasally “yank-yank” and they also may make a “phew” noise. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Red Crossbill (Loxia curvirostra)

Red Crossbills live in coniferous forests. Their diet includes seeds, berries, buds, and minerals such as salt. Red Crossbills sing a metallic “twee-twee-twee-twee twup -twin-a-twin-a.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Don Faulkner

 

Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus)

Red-eyed Vireos live mostly in deciduous forests. Their diet consists of insects, berries, and some fruit. The Vireo’s “Red eye” does not develop until after their first year, when it changes from brown to a shade of red. Their wingspan is 9.1-9.8 in. and they weigh 0.4-0.9 oz. One of the Red-eyed Vireo’s calls says “myah” in a nasal tone. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Red-headed Woodpecker (Melanerpes erythrocephalus)

Red-headed Woodpeckers live in deciduous forests and open areas such as fields. Their diet consists of insects such a grasshoppers, fruit, and seeds. They are one of only a few species known to store food. Red-headed Woodpeckers are confused with Red-bellied Woodpeckers, because of the Red-bellied’s cap of red. Red-headed Woodpeckers have a full head of red. They weigh 2-3.2 oz. and have an average wingspan of 16.5 in. They drum on metal and make “chur” calls. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Red-shouldered Hawk (Buteo lineatus)

Found throughout North America and live in forests and swamp areas. Red-shouldered Hawks weigh about 17.1-27.3 oz. with a wingspan of 37-43.7 in. They communicate by vocalization sounding like "kee-aah", flight courting, and physical displays. They eat rabbits, squirrels, lizards, snakes, frogs, and toads. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Andy Morffew

Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis)

Found throughout the United states and live in open areas such as grasslands, woodlands, deserts, and parks. Red-tailed Hawks vary in size depending on sex. Females tend to be larger than males, with a wingspan of 44.9-52.4 in and a weight of around 31.7-51.5 oz. Males also have a wingspan of 44.9-52.4 in., but weigh less than the females at around 24.3-45.9 oz. They are also usually about 2 inches shorter than females. Red-tailed Hawks communicate with "kee-eeee-arrr” shrieks. Their shrill scream is used in movies for most when eagles and hawks appear. They eat many mammals, reptiles, small and medium sized birds, amphibians, and sometimes carrion. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Stephanie Tardif

Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus)

Red-winged Blackbirds live in open, marshy, and grassy areas. Their main diet is insects and seeds from nearby grasses. They weigh around 1.1-2.7 oz. and have a wingspan of 12.2-15.7 in. Their call is known to almost everyone, and sounds like “conk-la-ree” with a trilling noise to end. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Ring-billed Gull (Larus delewarensis)

Ring-billed Gulls live on the coasts of bodies of water, in open fields, and in suburban areas and garbage dumps. Their diet consists of fish, insects, and garbage. Their wingspan is 3.4-3.8 ft. and they weigh 10.6-24.7 oz. The Ring-billed Gulls’ call is similar to that of a Herring Gull’s,but higher pitched. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Judy Gallagher

Ring-necked Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus)

Ring-necked Pheasants live in grassy areas such as grasslands, prairies, fields, and meadows. Their diet includes insects, seeds, and other plant matter. They have a wingspan of 22-33.9 in. and weigh 1.1-6.6 lbs. Ring-necked Pheasants are native to Asia, but were brought to other continents as game birds. Their call is that of multiple “caw-caw” phrases. They are NOT protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Jerry Reed/WisconsinDNR

Rock Pigeon (Columba livia)

Rock Pigeons are some of the most common birds seen in cities. They live near people and nest on manmade structures such as windowsills, rooftops, and bridges. Their diet is mainly made up of seeds, but also includes food litter. Their plumage ranges from the natural gray with black accents to red or white. Rock Pigeons weigh 9.3-13.4 oz. and have a wingspan of 19.7-26.4 in. Their call is a soft cooing that is not like Mourning Doves’. They are NOT protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Tony Alter

Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicanus)

Rose-Breasted Grosbeaks are native to the eastern United States. They prefer to live in deciduous forests, parks, and gardens. Their diet consists of insects, fruits, berries, and seeds. Rose-Breasted Grosbeaks weigh up to 39–49 g and have a wingspan of 11.4–13 in. Their call note is a “Chink” and most common sound is a sweet Robin call. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Rough-legged Hawk (Buteo lagopus)

Rough-legged Hawks prefer arctic and subarctic habitats, but winter in open areas and fields in the United States. Rough-legged Hawks weigh about 25.2-49.4 oz. with wingspan of 52-54.3 in. Startled adults may make a “mew” similar to a cat while nesting. Rough-legged Hawks mostly eat small mammals, but sometimes eat other birds. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Jon Nelson

Ruby-throated Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris)

Ruby-throats live near the edges of forests and in habitats near open, grassy areas. Their main food source is nectar from flowers, but occasionally consume small insects. They are the only hummingbird found in the eastern United States. They tend to weigh anywhere from 0.1-0.2 oz. and have wingspan of 3.1-4.3 in. Their most common call is a chirpy “chee-dit.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Judy Campbell

Rusty Blackbird (Euphagus carolinus)

Rusty Blackbirds live in wet areas such as forests, swamps, marshes, and muskeg. Their diet consists of insects such as mayflies, grasshoppers, and water beetles, seeds, aquatic invertebrates, amphibians, and some berries. Their average wingspan is 2 ft. and they weigh 1.7-2.8 oz. Rusty Blackbirds sing a note that sounds like rusty hinges being squeaked. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Savannah Sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis)

Savannah Sparrows live in open areas such as grasslands, fields, wetlands, and tundra. Their diet includes insects, arachnids, and seeds. They weigh 0.5-1 oz. and have a wingspan of 7.9-8.7 in. Savannah Sparrows sing “tsip-tsip-tsip-tsip-te-te-tzerrrrr.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Scarlet Tanager (Piranga olivicea)

Scarlet Tanagers live mostly in deciduous forests, but also some mixed and coniferous forests. Their diet consists of insects, other invertebrates, and berries. They weigh 0.8-1.3 oz. and have a wingspan of 9.8-11.4 in. Scarlet Tanagers sing a hurried, warble. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Sedge Wren (Cistothorus platensis)

Sedge Wrens live in sedges in wetlands such as marshes. Their diet includes insects and spiders. Sedge Wrens grow to be 3.9-4.7 in. in length. Their call sounds like two stones being hit together, like a “chip.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Sharp-Shinned hawk (Accipiter striatus)

Sharp-shinned Hawks are found throughout most of North America and live in forests or urban areas where trees and feeders can be found. They are the smallest hawks in North America, and look like juvenile Cooper's Hawks. Sharp-shinned Hawks weigh about 3.1-7.7 oz with a wingspan of 16.9-22 in. They are normally silent until around mating season, when they use alarm calls that sound like “kik-kik-kik.” They hunt small mammals, birds, and insects. When they eat birds they will pluck the feathers before consuming. The longest recorded life span was 13 years. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Brent Myers

Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia)

Song Sparrows live in deciduous and mixed open woodland. Their diet consists of invertebrates such as insects, arachnids, and mollusks, seeds, fruit, and berries. Their wingspan is 7.1-9.4 in. and they weigh 0.4-1.9 oz. Song Sparrows’ call starts with “chip-chip-chip-chippeerr” and ends with a mechanical sounding trill and chip notes. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Swamp Sparrow (Melospiza georgiana)

Swamp Sparrows live in marshes and wetland areas. Their diet consists of insects and seeds. Their wingspan is 7.1-7.5 in. and they weigh 0.4-0.8 oz. Swamp Sparrows sing a trill note. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Tree Swallow (Tachycineta bicolor)

Tree Swallows live mostly in open areas near bodies of water. They eat insects, invertebrates, and berries. They make a high-pitched call that is made up of a chirp, a whine, and a gurgle. Their wingspan is 11.8-13.8 in. and they can weigh 0.6-0.9 oz. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Tufted Titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor)

Tufted Titmice live in deciduous and mixed forests, but also live in residential areas. They have a wingspan of 7.9-10.2 in. and weigh 0.6-0.9 oz. Their call sounds like “Peter-peter-peter” and they also make sounds that resemble a chickadee. Tufted Titmice eat insects, seeds, and fruit. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura)

Turkey Vultures live in mostly open areas, but also partially wooded areas. Their diet consists of dead animals, or carrion, and occasionally decaying plant matter. Unlike most birds, they have a good sense of smell in order to locate their food. Their wingspan can be 5.5-6 ft. and is characterized by a wobbly “V” when soaring. They are 2-3 ft. tall and weigh about 4.4 lbs. Turkey Vultures do not have vocal chords, so they do not have any distinct calls besides rare hisses made when threatened. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: David Merrett

Veery (Catharus fuscescens)

Veeries live mostly in deciduous forests that are wet. Their diet consists of insects, small amphibians, and berries. They weigh 1-1.9 oz. and have a wingspan of 11-11.4 oz. Veeries sing a trill followed by “wheew”s. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Vesper Sparrow (Pooecetes gramineus)

Vesper Sparrows live in open areas such as meadows, prairies, and grasslands. Their diet consists of seeds, insects, and arachnids. They have an average wingspan of 9.4 in. and weigh 0.7-1 oz. Vesper Sparrows sing “come-come-where-where-all-together-down-the-hill.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Jay Phagan

Warbling Vireo (Vireo gilvus)

Warbling Vireos live in deciduous and mixed woods. Their diet consists of insects such as butterflies and their larvae, beetles, and arachnids, and berries. Their wingspan is about 8.7 in. and they weigh 0.4-0.6 oz. Like their name suggests, the Warbling Vireo’s song is warbled, and ends with a higher pitched note than the rest. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

White-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis)

White-breasted Nuthatches are the largest among nuthatches and live mostly in deciduous forests. They eat seeds, insects, and nuts. White-breasted Nuthatches are most likely going to be seen hanging upside down on the sides of trees due to their strong feet. They have a wingspan of 7.9-10.6 in. and weigh about 0.6-1.1 oz. Their common calls are both nasally and are a “yank” and “wha-wha-wha.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

White-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys)

White-crowned Sparrows live in brushy areas such as chaparral, forest edges, and scrub. Their diet consists of insects, seeds and berries. They weigh 0.9-1 oz. and have a wingspan of 8.3-9.4 in. White-crowned Sparrows sing a series of whistles that end with buzzes or trills. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

White-eyed Vireo (Vireo griseus)

White-eyed Vireos live in dense undergrowth such as shrubs and scrub. Their diet consists of insects and berries. They weigh 0.4-0.5 oz. and have an average wingspan of 6.7 in. White-eyed Vireos have multiple calls that sound like “chip-a-weeoo-chip” and “Quick, give me a rain check.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis)

White-throated Sparrows live in deciduous and coniferous forests. Their diet consists of seeds, insects, and berries. They weigh 0.8-1.1 oz. and have a 7.9-9.1 in. wingspan. White-throated Sparrows sing “Oh-Canada-Canada-Canada-Canada.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: John Flannery

Willow Flyctcher (Empidonax traillii)

Willow Flycatchers live in marshy areas with willow trees and other deciduous trees. Their diet consists of winged insects and berries. They weigh 0.4-0.6 oz. and have a wingspan of 7.5-9.4 in. Willow Flycatchers and Alder Flycatchers look so similar that they were once considered the same species, the Traill’s Flycatcher. They only way most people can tell them apart is by their calls. Willow Flycatchers sing a buzzy “fitz-bew” or “pit-speer.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Winter Wren (Troglodytes hiemalis)

Winter Wrens live mostly in coniferous forests, but also deciduous. Their diet consists of insects, arthropods, arachnids, and berries. They have a wingspan 4.7-6.3 in. and weigh 0.3-0.4 oz. Winter Wrens sing a series of fluid whistling notes, almost like a trill. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Wood Duck (Aix sponsa)

Wood Ducks live near bodies of water such as rivers, lakes, ponds, and swamps in cavities in trees and nesting boxes. Their diet includes plant matter such as seeds, leaves, and nuts, and animals such as insects and other aquatic invertebrates. Their wingspan is 2.2-2.4 ft. and they weigh 1-2 lbs. Female Wood Ducks have a call that says “oo-wee oo-wee” and males have a whistle that sounds like “jeeee?” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Rodney Campbell

Wood Thrush (Hylocichla mustelina)

Wood Thrushes live mostly in deciduous or mixed woodlands. Their diet consists of insects of berries, but includes snails before breeding. Their wingspan is 11.8-13.4 in. and they weigh 1.4-1.8 oz. Wood Thrushes sing “ee-oh-lay” where the “lay” part is trilled. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Yellow Warbler (Setophaga petechia)

Yellow Warblers live in woods bordering bodies of water. Their diet includes insects such as leafhoppers, caterpillars, and flies, and berries. They weigh 0.3-0.4 oz. and have a wingspan of 6.3-7.9 in. Yellow Warblers sing a well-known song that says “sweet-sweet-sweet. I’m so sweet.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Yellow-billed Cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus)

Yellow-billed Cuckoos live in mostly deciduous woods near a source of water. Their diet consists of insects such as hairy caterpillars, amphibians, berries, and seeds. They weigh 1.9-2.3 oz. and have a wingspan of 15-16.9 in. Yellow-Billed Cuckoos make a wooden sounding “ka-ka-ka-ka-ka-ka-kow-kow-kow-kowp-kowp” noise that slows as it ends. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Yellow-breasted Chat (Icteria virens)

Yellow-breasted Chats live in dense shrubby areas such as bushes thickets near rivers or streams. They eat insects, arachnids, berries, fruit, and occasionally, bird seed. Their average wingspan is 9.8 in. and they weigh 0.8-1.1 oz. Their call may consist of many sounds, such as mews, cackles, caws, and whistles. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Yellow-throated Vireo (Vireo flavifrons)

Yellow-throated Vireos live on the edges of deciduous and mixed forests. Their diet consists of insects, berries, and seeds. They have an average wingspan of 9.1 and weigh 0.5-0.7 oz. Yellow-throated Vireos have a call that is similar to the Red-eyed Vireo. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Photo Credits: Matt Tillett

Species Breeds Summer Winter
Acadian Flycatcher Occasional Rare  
American Crow Annual Abundant Abundant
American Goldfinch Annual Abundant Fair
American Kestrel Annual Fair Uncommon
American Redstart Possible Rare  
American Robin Annual Abundant Rare
American Tree Sparrow     Common
American Woodcock Occasional Rare  
Bald Eagle     Rare
Barn Swallow Annual Common  
Barred Owl Annual Fair Fair
Bell’s Vireo Possible Rare  
Belted Kingfisher Annual Uncommon Rare
Black-billed Cuckoo Annual Uncommon  
Black-capped Chickadee Annual Abundant Abundant
Blue Jay Annual Abundant Abundant
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher Annual Uncommon  
Blue-winged Warbler Possible Rare  
Bobolink Occasional Rare  
Broad-winged Hawk Possible Rare  
Brown Creeper     Uncommon
Brown Thrasher Annual Fair  
Brown-headed Cowbird Annual Abundant  
Canada Goose Possible Rare Rare
Carolina Wren Occasional Rare Rare
Cedar Waxwing Annual Common Rare
Cerulean Warbler Possible Rare  
Chestnut-sided Warbler Possible Rare  
Chimney Swift Occasional Fair  
Chipping Sparrow Annual Common  
Cliff Swallow   Rare  
Common Grackle Annual Abundant  
Common Nighthawk Occasional Rare  
Common Redpoll     Rare
Common Snipe     Rare
Common Yellowthroat Annual Common  
Cooper’s Hawk Possible Rare Rare
Dark-eyed Junco     Abundant
Dickcissel Occasional Rare  
Downy Woodpecker Annual Abundant Abundant
Eastern Bluebird Annual Uncommon  
Eastern Kingbird Annual Fair  
Eastern Meadowlark Annual Fair  
Eastern Phoebe Annual Fair  
Eastern Screech Owl Annual Fair Fair
Eastern Wood Pewee Annual Common  
European Starling Annual Abundant Abundant
Evening Grosbeak     Rare
Field Sparrow Annual Common  
Fox Sparrow     Rare
Golden-crowned Kinglet     Rare
Grasshopper Sparrow Occasional Rare  
Gray Catbird Annual Common  
Great Blue Heron   Uncommon Rare
Great Crested Flycatcher Annual Common  
Great Horned Owl Annual Fair Fair
Green-backed Heron Annual Uncommon  
Hairy Woodpecker Annual Fair Fair
Herring Gull     Rare
Horned Lark Possible Rare Rare
House Finch Annual Common Common
House Sparrow Annual Abundant Abundant
House Wren Annual Abundant  
Indigo Bunting Annual Abundant  
Kentucky Warbler Possible Rare  
Killdeer Occasional Uncommon  
Least Flycatcher Occasional Rare  
Lincoln’s Sparrow     Rare
Long-eared Owl     Rare
Louisiana Waterthrush Occasional Rare  
Mallard Annual Fair Rare
Mourning Dove Annual Abundant Fair
Mourning Warbler Possible Rare  
N Rough-winged Swallow Occasional Rare  
Northern Bobwhite   Rare Rare
Northern Cardinal Annual Abundant Abundant
Northern Flicker Annual Common Rare
Northern Oriole Annual Common  
Northern Parula Warbler Possible Rare  
Northern Saw-whet Owl     Rare
Orchard Oriole Occasional Rare  
Ovenbird Occasional Rare  
Pileated Woodpecker Possible Rare Rare
Pine Siskin     Rare
Purple Finch     Rare
Red Crossbill     Rare
Red-bellied Woodpecker Annual Common Common
Red-breasted Nuthatch     Rare
Red-eyed Vireo Annual Common  
Red-headed Woodpecker Annual Fair Rare
Red-shouldered Hawk Possible Rare  
Red-tailed Hawk Annual Fair Fair
Red-winged Blackbird Annual Abundant  
Ring-billed Gull     Rare
Ring-necked Pheasant Possible Uncommon Uncommon
Rock Pigeon Annual Abundant Abundant
Rose-breasted Grosbeak Annual Fair  
Rough-legged Hawk     Uncommon
Ruby-throated Hummingbird Possible Rare  
Rufous-sided Towhee Annual Fair Rare
Rusty Blackbird     Rare
Savannah Sparrow Occasional Uncommon  
Scarlet Tanager Annual Uncommon  
Sedge Wren Occasional Rare  
Sharp-shinned Hawk     Rare
Song Sparrow Annual Abundant Uncommon
Species Breeds Summer Resident Winter Resident
Swamp Sparrow Annual Fair Rare
Tree Swallow   Uncommon Rare
Tufted Titmouse Annual Common Common
Turkey Vulture Possible Uncommon  
Veery Occasional Rare  
Vesper Sparrow Occasional Uncommon  
Warbling Vireo Occasional Rare  
Whip-poor-will Occasional Rare  
White-breasted Nuthatch Annual Common Common
White-crowned Sparrow     Rare
White-eyed Vireo Possible Rare  
White-throated Sparrow     Rare
Willow Flycatcher Occasional Rare  
Winter Wren     Rare
Wood Duck Annual Uncommon Rare
Wood Thrush Annual Uncommon  
Yellow Warbler Annual Common  
Yellow-billed Cuckoo Annual Uncommon  
Yellow-breasted Chat Possible Rare  
Yellow-throated Vireo Occasional Uncommon