Migratory Birds

Species in the following list may pause at the Dells briefly during their annual migrations. The row marked “Frequency” indicates the general chance that a given species will visit any particular season.

Alder Flycatcher (Empidonax alnorum)

Alder Flycatchers live in wet shrubby areas. They eat mainly insects and sometimes berries and seeds. They were previously categorized with Willow Flycatchers, as the only difference between the two species is their call. Alder Flycatchers can weigh 0.4-0.5 oz. and have a wingspan of 8.3-9.4 in. Their call is similar to that of an Eastern Phoebe, but says “fee-bee-o” instead. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: John Schwarz

American Bittern (Botaurus lentiginosus)

American Bitterns reside in wet, marshy areas that are made up of freshwater and reed-like plants. Their diet consists mostly of aquatic animals such as small fish and invertebrates, but can extend to small rodents and insects. They have a wingspan of about 36.2 in. and can grow to be 13.1 - 17.6 oz. American Bitterns are usually heard, not seen, due to their exceptional camouflage and low calls. They have multiple calls that include “pump-er-luck,” “kok-kok-kok,” or “chu-peep.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: Gentry Sallie, USFWS

American Golden-Plover (Pluvialis dominica)

American Golden-Plovers live in tundra, grasslands, and shorelines. Their main diet consists of insects, but they also eat seeds. Their average wingspan is 22.4 in. and they weigh 4.3-6.8 oz. Their common call is “que-dal” or “tuu-u-ee.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: Peter Wilton

Bank Swallow (Riparia riparia)

The Bank Swallow is the smallest swallow and is also known as the Sand Martin. They live in holes in banks near water. Bank Swallows have a wingspan of 9.8-11.4 in. and weigh 0.4-0.7 oz. Their diet consists of aerial insects. Bank Swallows make a twittering noise. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: Francesco Veronesi

Bay-breasted Warbler (Setophaga castanea)

Bay-Breasted Warblers live in coniferous forests. Their diet consists of insects, arachnids, and fruit. Bay-Breasted Warblers weigh 0.4-0.6 oz and have a wingspan of 7.9-8.7 in. There have been occasions when they hybridized with Blackpoll, Yellow-rumped, and Blackburnian Warblers. Their call is a high “seetzy-seetzy-seetzy.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Uncommon

Photo Credits: Dan Pancamo

Black-and-White Warbler (Mniotilta varia)

Black-and-White Warblers live in deciduous and mixed forests. Their diet consists of insects. Their wingspan is 7.1-8.7 in. and weigh 0.3-0.5 oz. Black-and-White Warblers sing “weezy-weezy-weezy” during mating season. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Common

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Black-throated Blue Warbler (Setophaga caerulescens)

Black-throated Blue Warblers live in deciduous and mixed forests with dense undergrowth. They mainly eat insects, but also fruits and seeds. These warblers weigh about 0.3-0.4 oz. and have a wingspan of 6.7-7.9 in. Their call is “zoo, zoo, zoo, zoo, zee.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Uncommon

Photo Credits: John Schwarz

Black-throated Green Warbler (Setophaga virens)

Black-throated Green Warblers live in coniferous and mixed forests. Their diet consists of insects and berries. They weigh 0.2-0.4 oz. and have a wingspan of 6.7-7.9 in. Black-throated Green Warblers have a call that sounds like “zoo-zee-zoo-zoo-zee.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Fair

Photo Credits: Dan Pancamo

Blackburnian Warbler (Setophaga fusca)

Blackburnian Warblers live in coniferous and mixed forests. Their diet consists of insects, arachnids, and berries. They weigh 0.3-0.5 oz. and have a wingspan of 7.9-8.3 in. They have multiple calls, two of which are “sleet-sleet-sleet-sleet” and “teetsa, teetsa, teetsa, teetsa, tseee.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Uncommon

Photo Credits: Mdf

Blackpoll Warbler (Setophaga striata)

Blackpoll Warblers live in coniferous forests, such as the boreal forest of Canada, and deciduous forests. Their diet consists of insects, arachnids, and fruits. They weigh 0.4-0.5 oz. and have a wingspan of 8.3-9.1 in. Blackpoll Warblers have a very high-pitched call that flickers while it says “seet-seet-seet-seet-seet.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Uncommon

Photo Credits: Simon Pierre Barrette

Blue-headed Vireo (Vireo solitarius)

Blue-headed Vireos live mostly in mixed forests. Their diet consists of insects, berries, and fruits. They have a wingspan of 7.9-9.4 in. and weigh 0.5-0.6 oz. Blue-headed Vireos’ call sounds like maracas being shaken. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.  

Frequency: Uncommon

Photo Credits: Andy Reago & Chrissy McClarren

Blue-winged Teal (Anas discors)

Blue-winged Teals live in vegetated wetlands such as calm ponds, lakes, and marshes. They feed primarily on seeds, but also eat aquatic invertebrates. Their wingspan is about 2 ft. and they weigh 8.1-19.2 oz. Their call sounds like peeps and can get nasal. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Uncommon

Photo Credits: Andrea Westmoreland

Bonaparte's Gull (Chroicocephalus philadelphia)

Bonaparte’s Gulls live in bays, lakes, marshes, and rivers. They are the only gull that is known to regularly nest in trees. Their diet consists of insects, fish, crustaceans, and other invertebrates. Bonaparte’s Gulls have a wingspan of 29.9-31.5 in. and weigh 6.3-7.9 oz. Their call is a graty “keh-keh-keh.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: Dick Daniels

Canada Warbler (Cardellina canadensis)

Canada Warblers live in mixed forests and near moist areas such as swamps and streams. Their diet consists of insects and arachnids. They have a wingspan of 6.7-8.7 in. and weigh 0.3-0.5 oz. Their call is a rapid chittering series. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Fair

Photo Credits: Jeremy Meyer

Canvasback (Aythya valisineria)

Canvasbacks live in lakes, marshes, and other wetlands. Their diet consists of plant material such as tubers, leaves, and seeds, and aquatic insects and fish. They have a wingspan of about 3 ft. and weigh 2-3.5 lbs. The Canvasback mating call is “krr-krr-krrr.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: John Schwarz (Male Pictured)

Cape May Warbler (Setophaga tigrina)

Cape May Warblers live in coniferous forests. Their diet consists of insects and fruit. They weigh 0.3-0.4 oz. and have a wingspan of 7.5-8.7 in. Cape May Warblers have a “seet” call that is repeated 4-8 times. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Uncommon

Photo Credits: John Schwarz

Connecticut Warbler (Oporornis agilis)

Connecticut Warblers live in spruce bogs and thickets. Their diet consists of insects, arachnids, and fruit. They weigh about 0.5 oz. and have a wingspan of about 8.7 in. Though they are named Connecticut Warblers because the first bird was recorded there, Connecticut Warblers are rarely seen in Connecticut. Their call is a chirpy “beecher-beecher-beecher-beech.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: John Schwarz

Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos)

Golden Eagles are most commonly found in grasslands and cliffsides in Western North America. Their diet consists of small/medium mammals, small/medium birds, fish, reptiles, and occasionally, carrion. The Golden Eagle is respected by many cultures, and is the national animal of Mexico, Germany, Austria, Albania, and Kazakhstan. They can weigh anywhere from 6.6-13.5 lbs. And have a wingspan of 6-7.2 ft. Their call is a high-pitched “kee-kee-kee” or “yelp” noise. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: Tony Hisgett

Golden-winged Warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera)

Golden-winged Warblers live in wet, shrubby areas. Once the young have started to fly, they move to older forests. These birds eat insects and arachnids. Golden-winged Warblers have one of the smallest breeding populations, with 410,000 individuals, but are not yet considered “endangered.” One factor may be competition and hybrid breeding with the Blue-winged Warbler, which either results in a “Brewster’s Warbler” or a “Lawrence’s Warbler.” Regular Golden-winged Warblers are about 5.1 in. tall and weigh about 0.3-0.4 oz. They make noises such as “tzip,” “zeeee,” and buzzing sounds. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Frequency: Uncommon

Photo Credits: Caleb Putnam

Gray-cheeked Thrush (Catharus minimus)

Gray-cheeked Thrushes live in scrubby areas of the tundra and boreal forest. They eat insects, spiders, and fruit. They weigh 0.9-1.1 oz. and are 6.3-6.7 in. in length. Gray-cheeked Thrushes sing. Like most thrushes, a reedy-flutish song that descends in pitch. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: John Benson

Hermit Thrush (Catharus guttatus)

Hermit Thrushes live in open wooded areas. They eat insects, berries, arachnids, and some amphibians. Their wingspan is 9.8-11.4 in. and they weigh 0.8-1.3 oz. Hermit Thrushes sing “oh, holy holy, a, purity, purity, eh, sweetly, sweetly.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Common

Photo Credits: Alan Schmierer

Hooded Warbler (Setophaga citrina)

Hooded Warblers live in deciduous and mixed forest undergrowth. Their diet includes insects and arachnids. Hooded Warblers weigh 0.3-0.4 oz. and are about 5 in. in length. Their call is “ta-wit ta-wit ta-wit tee-o.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: Ken Janes

Lapland Longspur (Calcarius lapponicus)

Lapland Longspurs live in open areas such as fields and tundra. Their diet consists of seeds and insects such as flies. Their wingspan is 8.7-11 in. and they weigh 0.8-1.2 oz. Lapland Longspurs’ songs sound similar to the Red-winged Blackbirds, but are bubblier and chirpier. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: Ómar Runólfsson 

LeConte's Sparrow (Ammodramus lecontei)

LeConte’s Sparrows live in open, grassy areas such as meadows, marshes, and prairies. They eat insects, spiders, and seeds. They weigh 0.4-0.6 oz. and have an average wingspan of 7.1 in. LeConte’s Sparrows make a sound that is two buzzing noises, one long, one short. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: Laura Erickson

Lesser Scaup (Aythya affinis)

Lesser Scaups can be found in bodies of water such as lakes and ponds, and in marshes and wetlands. Their diet consists of mollusks, crustaceans, and aquatic plant material. They weigh 1-2.5 lbs. and have a wingspan of 2-2.5 ft. Female Lesser Scaups make a “garf, garf” noise during mating season and males make a “whe-o” sound. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: Mike's Birds

Lesser Yellowlegs (Tringa flavipes)

Lesser Yellowlegs live in boreal forests and wetlands such as marshes and ponds. Their diet includes insects, fish, crustaceans, and mollusks. Their wingspan is 23.2-25.2 in. and they weigh 2.4-3.3 oz. Lesser Yellowlegs make a “tu-tu” noise. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: USFWS

Magnolia Warbler (Setophaga magnolia)

Magnolia Warblers live in short coniferous forests and some mixed forests. Their diet consists of insects and arachnids. Their wingspan is 6.3-7.9 in. and they weigh 0.2-0.5 oz. Magnolia Warblers have a call that sounds like “weeta-weeta-weeteo.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.  

Frequency: Fair

Photo Credits: William H. Majoros

Marsh Wren (Cistothorus palustris)

Marsh Wrens live in marshes with reeds. Their diet consists of insects, arachnids, and other invertebrates. They weigh 0.3-0.5 oz. and are 3.9-5.5 in. long. Marsh Wrens make a high pitched trilling noise. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: Tom Keorner

Merlin (Falco columbarius)

Merlins generally live in open areas, but habitat depends on which region of North America they live. Their diet consists of smaller birds, insects, and small mammals such as bats and rodents. They have a wingspan of 20.9-26.8 in. and weigh 5.6-8.5 oz. Merlins sometimes make a call like the American Kestrel’s “klee-klee-klee,” but usually do not make much noise. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: Flickr User Seabamirum

Nashville Warbler (Oreothlypis ruficapilla)

Nashville Warblers live in coniferous and deciduous forests. Their diet is predominantly insects. They can grow to be 0.2-0.4 oz. and have a wingspan of 6.7-7.9 in. They sing “teebit-teebit-teebit” and “chipper-chipper-chipper.” Nashville Warblers are considered “Climate Threatened,” which means that climate change could potentially threaten their population. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Frequency: Fair

Photo Credits: HormonyonPlanetEarth

Northern Harrier (Circus cyaneus)

North America is home to only one type of harrier, the Northern Harrier. Its facial features resemble those of owls more than hawks. They live in open areas such as marshes, prairies, and meadows. Their diet consists of small mammals, birds, large insects, reptiles, and amphibians. Northern Harriers are usually 10.6-26.5 oz. and have a wingspan of 3.4-3.9 ft. Their call consists of various “kek” notes. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: dfaulder

 

Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos)

Northern Mockingbirds live in open areas with dense undergrowth such as thickets, brush, and also in urban areas such as neighborhoods and parks. Their diet includes insects, berries, and fruit. They weigh 1.6-2 oz. and have a wingspan of 12.2-13.8 in. Northern Mockingbird are named for their ability to mimic other birds’ songs. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.  

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: Calibas (Wikimedia Commons)

Northern Waterthrush (Parkesia noveboracensis)

Northern Waterthrushes live in coniferous forests that are boggy and wet. Their diet consists of insects, fish, and crustaceans. They weigh 0.5-0.9 oz. and have a wingspan of 8.3-9.4 oz. Northern Waterthrushes sing a series of “chee-chee-chee-chip-chip-chew-chew-chew” that accelerates towards the end. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Fair

Photo Credits: Jessica Bolser/USFWS

Olive-sided Flycatcher (Contopus cooperi)

Olive-sided Flycatchers live in coniferous forests and their edges. Their diet consists of flying insects. They are 7.1-7.9 in. tall and weigh 1.1-1.3 oz. Olive-sided Flycatchers sing “quick-THREE-BEERS” and their call is “pip-pip-pip.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Uncommon

Photo Credits: Becky Matsubara

Orange-crowned Warbler (Oreothlypis celata)

Orange-crowned Warblers live in all types of forests and their undergrowth. Their diet includes insects, arachnids, seeds, and fruit. Their average wingspan is 7.5 in. and they weigh 0.2-0.4 oz. Orange-crowned Warblers make a high pitched trill noise. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Uncommon

Photo Credits: Dan Pancamo

Osprey (Pandion haliaetus)

Ospreys prefer to live by bodies of water where food is abundant. They weigh about 49.4 to 70.5 oz. with a wingspan of 59.1-70.9 in. The average lifespan for an Osprey is about 25 years. They communicate by using visual display, flight displays, and giving calls/alarms that are usually high pitched. They eat predominantly fish, but occasionally snack on mammals and other birds. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: Gareth Rasberry

Palm Warbler (Setophaga palmarum)

Palm Warblers live in the boreal forest of Canada. They eat insects, seeds, and berries. They weigh about 0.2-0.5 oz. and have a wingspan of 7.9-8.3 in. Palm Warblers sometimes make a call that sounds like a Chipping Sparrow’s and also make a “seep” noise. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Common

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Pectoral Sandpiper (Calidris melanotos)

Pectoral Sandpipers live in wetland areas such as tundra, marshes, and mudflats. They eat insects, spiders, and crustaceans. Their average wingspan is 16.9 in. and they weigh 1.4-3.7 oz. Pectoral Sandpiper males have a pouch in their throat where they store air for mating displays. This is where they get their “pectoral” name. Their calls are “kuurp”s and gurgling noises. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: Andrew Cannizzaro

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus)

The Peregrine Falcon is the largest falcon in North America and can be found on every continent besides Antarctica. They are most commonly found on cliffsides near open areas. Their diet consists mostly of other birds, but also includes small mammals and stolen prey such as fish. Peregrine Falcons have a wingspan of 3.3-3.6 ft. and weigh 1.2-3.5 lbs. Their call is a “kak-kak-kak.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: Carlos Delgado

Philadelphia Vireo (Vireo philadelphicus)

Philadelphia Vireos live mostly in deciduous forests and their edges. They eat insects and berries. They weigh 0.4-0.5 oz. and are 4.3-5.1 in. in length. Philadelphia Vireos make a call that is similar to the Red-eyed Vireos: the call says “See me? Here I am. Up here. See me?” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Pine Warbler (Setophaga pinus)

Pine Warblers live, as their name suggests, in pine forests. They eat insects, arachnids, seeds, fruit, and berries. Their wingspan is 7.5-9.1 in. and they weigh 0.3-0.5 oz. Pine Warblers sing a series of trills. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: Mickey Estes

Prothonotary Warbler (Protonotaria citrea)

Prothonotary Warblers live in wet wooded areas such as swamps and flooded forests. Their diet consists of insects, other invertebrates such as snails, fruit, and seeds. Prothonotary Warblers are slightly smaller than Song Sparrows. Their name comes from their bright yellow plumage that resembles the robes of Roman Catholic Prothonotaries. Their call is a series of “tweet-tweet-tweet-tweet-tweet” sounds. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: Don Faulkner

Purple Martin (Progne subis)

Purple Martins live near water where tree cavities or banks are abundant for burrows. They also roost in nesting boxes. In certain situations, they make calls such as “hee-hee,” “choo,” or “zwack/zweet.” Purple Martins weigh 1.6-2.1 oz. and have a wingspan of 15.4-16.1 in. Their diet consists of flying insects, just like other swallows. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: Ingrid Taylar

Ruby-crowned Kinglet (Regulus calendula)

Ruby-crowned Kinglets live mostly in coniferous forests, but also live in mixed woodlands. Their main diet is insects, and they occasionally eat berries and seeds. Their wingspan is 6.3-7.1 in. and they weigh 0.2-0.4 oz. Ruby-crowned Kinglets chatter and twitter. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Frequency: Common

Photo Credits: Nigel

Sandhill Crane (Grus canadensis)

Sandhill Cranes can be found in open areas with water such as grasslands, marshes, and wetlands. Their diet consists of seeds, tubers, invertebrates, small amphibians and reptiles, and sometimes small mammals. Their wingspan is around 6.5 ft. long and they can weigh 7.5-10.8 lbs. Some may stand up to 4 ft. tall. Sandhill Cranes make loud, low rattling calls that somewhat resemble goose honks at some points. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: Joseph C Boone

Solitary Sandpiper (Tringa solitaria)

Solitary Sandpipers live in wetland areas such as bogs and near ponds. They are one of only 2 species of Sandpipers that lay their eggs in tree nests. Their diet consists of insects, arachnids, mollusks, and crustaceans. They weigh 1.1-2.3 oz. and grow to be 7.5-9.1 in. in length. Solitary Sandpipers sing a similar “peet-weet” to Spotted Sandpipers that is more shrill. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Fair

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Sora (Porzana carolina)

The Sora lives in wetland areas such as marshes and along the edges of large bodies of water. They eat seeds and invertebrates such as insects and snails. Soras weigh 1.7-4 oz. and are about 7.9-9.8 in. in height. They have multiple calls, some of which are “sor-AH” and a repeated “ker-wee.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: Mike Baird

Spotted Sandpiper (Actitis macularius)

Spotted Sandpipers live in areas mostly near freshwater, such as rivers, ponds, and lakes. Their diet consists of insects, fish, and crustaceans. They have a wingspan of 14.6-15.7 in. and weigh 1.2-1.8 oz. Spotted Sandpipers make “pee-weet” sounds and sometimes trill the “pee” part. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: Jim Hudgins/USFWS

Swainson's Thrush (Catharus ustulatus)

Swainson’s Thrushes live in coniferous forests near streams. Their diet consists of insects and berries. Their wingspan is 11.4-12.2 in. and they weigh 0.8-1.6 oz. Swainson’s Thrushes sing a musical, reedy song that increases in pitch. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Fair

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Tennessee Warbler (Oreothlypis peregrina)

Tennessee Warblers live in coniferous forests, mainly those of Canada while breeding. Their diet consists of insects and berries. They have an average wingspan of 7.9 in. and weigh about 0.3-0.5 oz. Their most common song is a 2-3 note trill set with multiple syllables. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Frequency: Common

Photo Credits: Jerry Oldenettel

Tundra Swan (Cygnus columbianus)

Tundra Swans live in the tundra of North America, lakes, rivers, and other wetland areas. They eat aquatic plant matter, mollusks, and arthropods. They have an average wingspan of 5.5 ft. and weigh 8.4-23.2 lbs. Tundra Swans make high-pitched bugling noises. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: Dominic Sherony

Virginia Rail (Rallus limicola)

Virginia Rails live in marshes. They eat insects, crustaceans, fish, and seeds. Their wingspan is 12.6-15 in. and they weigh 2.3-3.4 oz. Virginia Rails sing a repeated, clicking “kid-ick” noise. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: Mike Baird

Western Meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta)

Western Meadowlarks live in open areas such as meadows, grasslands, prairies, and agricultural fields. They eat insects, arachnids, and seeds. Their wingspan is about 16 in. and they weigh 3.1-4.1 oz. Western Meadowlarks look practically identical to Eastern Meadowlarks, but can be differentiated most easily by their call. Their call is a series of descending gurgles, whereas the Eastern Meadowlark most commonly whistle. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: Becky Matsubara

Wilson's Warbler (Wilsonia pusilla)

Wilson’s Warblers live in thickets near water. They eat insects, arachnids, and berries. Adults weigh 0.2-0.4 oz. and have a wingspan of 5.5-6.7 in. Their most common call is a kissy sounding “chip.” Like the Nashville Warbler, Wilson’s Warblers are considered “Climate Threatened.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Frequency: Uncommon

Photo Credits: Kevin Vance

Worm-eating Warbler (Helmitheros vermivorum)

Worm-eating Warblers live in the understory of deciduous forests. Their diet consists of insects such as grasshoppers, caterpillars, and other larvae, but usually does not include earthworms. They weigh 0.4-0.5 oz. and are 4.3-5.1 in. in length. Worm-eating Warblers make an insect-like trill noise. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: Tom Friedel/www.birdphotos.com

Yellow-bellied Flycatcher (Empidonax flaviventris)

Yellow-Bellied Flycatchers live in coniferous forests and swamplands. They eat insects and sometimes fruit. They have a wingspan of 7.1-7.9 in. and weigh around 0.3-0.6 oz. They are odd in the sense that they build their nests on the ground as opposed to in a tree. Their calls are a “tu-wee” and a “che-lek.” They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: Simon Pierre Barrette

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus varius)

Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers live in both deciduous and coniferous forests. Typical signs that a Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers live nearby are horizontal lines of holes in the trunks of trees. Their main diet, as their name suggests, is tree sap, but they do eat insects and fruit. This type of woodpecker can grow to be 1.5-1.9 oz. and have a wingspan of 13.4-15.7 in. Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers make a “quee-ah quee-ah” noise and also make a mewing noise. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird lists.

Frequency: Fair

Photo Cedits: Dominic Sherony

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (Nyctanassa violacea)

Yellow-crowned Night-Herons are most commonly found in swamps, marshes, mangroves, and coastal wetlands. Their diet consists mainly of crustaceans such as crabs and crayfish, but also includes other aquatic animals such as small fish, invertebrates, and amphibians. They are about 2 ft. tall and weigh 1.4-1.8 lbs. These Night-Herons make “skow” and “squawk” noises. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: Terry Foote

Yellow-headed Blackbird (Xanthocephalus xanthocephalus)

Yellow-headed Blackbirds live in wetlands such as marshes, prairies, and reeds. Their diet consists of insects and seeds. They are larger than the common Red-winged Blackbird, with a wingspan of 16.5-17.3 in. and a weight of 1.6-3.5 oz. Yellow-headed Blackbirds have a call that sounds mechanical and unnerving. Their common call is a buzzy, “kerrrr” noise and few chirps. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: Becky Matsubara

Yellow-rumped Warbler (Setophaga coronata)

Yellow-rumped Warblers live mostly in coniferous forests, but also live in mixed forests. Their diet includes insects, berries, fruit, and food from feeders. Their wingspan is 7.5-9.1 in. and they weigh 0.4-0.5 oz. Yellow-rumped Warblers sing a warble that ends in a high note. They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Abundant

Photo Credits: Kelly Colgan Azar

Yellow-throated Warbler (Setophaga dominica)

Yellow-throated Warblers live in both deciduous and coniferous forests near streams or rivers. Their diet includes insects and arachnids. Their average wingspan is 8.3 in. and they weigh 0.3-0.4 oz. Yellow-throated Warblers sing “teew-teew-teew-tew-tew-twi.”They are protected on the US Migratory Bird list.

Frequency: Rare

Photo Credits: Pete Gumaskas